fbpx
 
Atticus Law Firm and Attorney Coaching Workshops

Articles

Knowing the answer to the question, "Can I bill for this task?" is one of the most typical problems that young attorneys confront. Showing up in court, speaking with your client about his or her legal concerns, and writing legal papers are all clearly chargeable services, but what about making copies after the secretary has gone home for the evening? More senior attorneys frequently do not offer clear answers to these queries, and guessing is frequently used. When your customer raises these concerns about a bill that reflects dubious work at attorney rates, you may be subjected to even more scrutiny, leading to late payments, disagreements, and a general loss of goodwill that may be costly. It’s important to note that some paralegals aren’t considered paralegals in some jurisdictions/states.  A paralegal's job description isn't always obvious. Lawyers are, of course, extensively regulated by the state bar associations in which they practice. A person cannot practice law or hold oneself out as a lawyer unless they have taken the bar , and are abiding by the state regulations. Paralegals, on the other hand, are typically not obliged to possess any specific licenses or certificates, and while paralegal training programs exist, their profession...

Keeping a practice afloat amid the unique obstacles presented by 2020 created off-the-chart stress for even the most even-keeled law firm owners, especially solo and small firm practitioners. While focusing on resolving last year’s challenges and problems, a lot of attorneys neglected their mental and physical well-being. They overworked themselves, leading to burnout....

Meet three attorneys who grew their law firms successfully in the face of 2020's obstacles. This article is based on a panel discussion hosted by Attorney and Atticus Practice Advisor, Steve Riley, and Atticus Director of Client Services, Denise Gamez. Steve and Denise interviewed three Atticus clients who grew their firms exponentially despite the unique challenges of 2020. Panelists: Shannon Sagan, Law Offices of Shannon J. Sagan, PA, Lake Worth, FL, www.1800flalawyer.com Roberta "Bobbie" Batley, Batley Powers Family Law, Albuquerque, NM, www.batleypowers.com Jonathan White, Jordan & White, LLC, Salem, MA, www.jordanwhitellc.com What Was the Biggest Challenge You Faced and Why? DENISE: "Bobbie, you just saw really great growth, what do you think was your biggest challenge?" BOBBIE: "As the Atticus Coaches know, my weakness is being the cheerleader, the hero in our firm in that role. I want to walk in every day and inspire people and set them on a straight course. I suffered a really devastating personal loss at the end of April and I couldn't be that… I just could not be that. So, my star associate, my paralegal, my office manager just pushed me out of the way, stepped in and became that. And, it was that great reminder to me...

One of the most important rules for any business operating remotely is to treat your referral sources well and keep in touch with them often. Your relationships with these fellow professionals and friends are your lifeline to new business. Begin with building and strengthening these relationships through referral marketing and start by identifying your top 20 referral sources. Make a list of this high-caliber referral base and call them personally – do not email them and do not ask your staff to call them....

In your law firm, nothing costs as much as your team — not the building, not the furnishings, not the marketing budget. But all these pale in comparison to the cost of a bad employee. Over time, a bad employee can drive away marketing contacts, clients, and even the good people on your staff, damaging your reputation, your success, and your bottom line....

Running your law firm remotely can have its challenges, but it also offers unique opportunities to build your practice and find new clients by connecting with your prospects in new ways and on their level. Imagine the number of clients and prospects who have never participated in a Zoom, WebEx, or Skype meeting. Think about the uncertainty and anxiety many may feel on their first client intake call using this strange, new technology....

Even before the Covid-19 crisis sent us all into lockdown and law firms became virtual overnight, studies showed that most people in the workplace spent 28% of their day dealing with unnecessary interruptions of all kinds. Some were self-generated; some came from co-workers and some originated from a disruptive environment. Now that many of us are working from home, the problem has become worse. Attorneys, paralegals, and team members of all kinds are faced with interruptions at a whole new level as they try to be productive from home. Spouses who are also working from home, kids that must be home-schooled, parents that must be cared for – the situation, especially for working parents, has become almost unmanageable....

[vc_row full_screen_section_height="no"][vc_column][vc_single_image image="11589" img_size="full" alignment="center"][vc_empty_space height="40px"][vc_column_text] Many Lawyer's Lead Lives of Quiet Desperation Even in the best of times, attorneys are prone to anxiety, depression and substance abuse. Over the last several years, attorneys have taken the lead among all professionals in these categories and many lead lives of quiet desperation as they struggle to cope with the increasing demands of clients, the need to produce a perfect work product and growing competition in the marketplace. According to Dr. Deborah Day, Psy.D, Licensed Mental Health Counselor and Certified Family Mediator in Winter Park, Florida, the additional stress forced upon attorneys dealing with the impact of Covid 19 has brought many to the breaking point. Attorneys in every stage and age of life are contemplating a future filled with unknowns and asking themselves if their firm, their job and their bank accounts will survive. Given that this pandemic has the potential to devastate many small businesses, these are legitimate concerns. Unfortunately, Dr. Day says, she’s noticed an alarming trend: these concerns are “leaking” into conversations with clients as attorneys allow themselves to speculate about their uncertain future. While she wants attorneys to communicate authentically, she warns this is not an appropriate outlet to process fears. Anxious...